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If you want to experience heavyweight battles in Pokémon Go, but don’t have access to many of the game’s Legendaries, then Master League Premier is your time to shine, as it sets the focus on monsters that are more widely available and don’t need to be raided for.

Master League Premier will run from June 28 to July 6, 2023, and features triple Stardust rewards for every win.

This Go Battle League competition runs on a special ruleset without any competition point (CP) limits. You may not field Legendary and Mythical Pokémon as well as Ultra Beasts in this tournament.

Since this is a Master League competition with unlimited CP rules, having Pokémon upgraded with Candy XL is the best course of action without exception. As such, you won’t see our usual (XL) markings behind Pokémon names in this guide. Simply assume that Pokémon with Candy XL power-ups are the standard in this format.

Show your opponents that having many Legendaries is not necessary for becoming a great trainer with the best Pokémon for Master League Premier in Pokémon Go based on statistics and simulations provided by PvPoke.com.

Master League Premier: Best Leads

These Pokémon aggressively pressure your opponent right from the beginning of a duel and can survive even tough battles for quite a while – they are perfect to open a match up, enabling you to score an early knockout or set up a strong counter play.

  1. Dragonite (Dragon Breath, Dragon Claw, Superpower)
  2. Haxorus (Counter, Breaking Swipe, Night Slash)
  3. Florges (Fairy Wind, Disarming Voice, Moonblast)
  4. Shadow Dragonite (Dragon Breath, Dragon Claw, Superpower)
  5. Gyarados(S) (Dragon Breath, Aqua Tail, Crunch)
  6. Shadow Snorlax (Lick, Body Slam, Superpower)
  7. Magnezone(S) (Spark, Wild Charge, Mirror Shot)
  8. Sneasler (Shadow Claw, Close Combat, X-Scissor)
  9. Kommo-o (Dragon Tail, Close Combat, Dragon Claw)
  10. Excadrill (Mud Shot, Drill Run, Rock Slide)

(S) = Regular form and Shadow form perform comparably.

Master League Premier: Best Safe Switches

If the opening pairing is to your disadvantage, you should consider switching out your lead for another Pokémon. This is where this class comes into play. They are either strong leads themselves or are specialized in countering some of the most popular leads. In any case, a switch will preserve your original opener to fight later on in the battle and perhaps force your opponent to also adapt their strategy on the fly.

  1. Gyarados(S) (Dragon Breath, Aqua Tail, Crunch)
  2. Shadow Snorlax (Lick, Body Slam, Superpower)
  3. Mamoswine(S) (Powder Snow, Avalanche, High Horsepower)
  4. Ursaluna (Tackle, High Horsepower, Ice Punch)
  5. Golisopod (Shadow Claw, Liquidation, X-Scissor)
  6. Excadrill (Mud Shot, Drill Run, Rock Slide)
  7. Shadow Ursaluna (Tackle, High Horsepower, Ice Punch)
  8. Roserade (Poison Jab, Weather Ball (Fire), Leaf Storm)
  9. Haxorus (Counter, Breaking Swipe, Night Slash)
  10. Snorlax (Lick, Body Slam, Superpower)

Master League Premier: Best Closers

These Pokémon are particularly useful when there are no shields left in play on either side – they are incredibly tough themselves or end battles quickly thanks to powerful charge attacks, which can’t be deflected without a shield.

  1. Dragonite (Dragon Breath, Dragon Claw, Superpower)
  2. Garchomp (Mud Shot, Earth Power, Outrage)
  3. Metagross (Bullet Punch, Meteor Mash, Earthquake)
  4. Mamoswine(S) (Powder Snow, Avalanche, High Horsepower)
  5. Florges (Fairy Wind, Disarming Voice, Moonblast)
  6. Shadow Dragonite (Dragon Breath, Dragon Claw, Superpower)
  7. Gholdengo (Hex, Shadow Ball, Focus Blast)
  8. Ursaluna (Tackle, High Horsepower, Ice Punch)
  9. Goodra (Dragon Breath, Power Whip, Draco Meteor)
  10. Shadow Metagross (Bullet Punch, Meteor Mash, Earthquake)

Master League Premier: Best Attackers

These Pokémon perform best when fighting a trainer who still has shields, while you no longer have shields yourself. They combine important resistances and strong fast attacks to compensate for this disadvantage. For this reason, you rarely see Shadow forms in this role – they take more damage than their regular counterparts, making them a risky card to put on the table.

  1. Haxorus (Counter, Breaking Swipe, Night Slash)
  2. Florges (Fairy Wind, Disarming Voice, Moonblast)
  3. Dragonite (Dragon Breath, Dragon Claw, Superpower)
  4. Snorlax(S) (Lick, Body Slam, Superpower)
  5. Gyarados (Dragon Breath, Aqua Tail, Crunch)
  6. Avalugg (Ice Fang, Avalanche, Body Slam)
  7. Kommo-o (Dragon Tail, Close Combat, Dragon Claw)
  8. Garchomp(S) (Mud Shot, Earth Power, Outrage)
  9. Togekiss (Charm, Ancient Power, Flamethrower)
  10. Magnezone (Spark, Wild Charge, Mirror Shot)

Any Master League format is very costly to get into due to the required Candy XL amounts, but the Premier edition at least opens things up a little bit by banning Legendaries and other rare Pokémon categories that are difficult to power up. On the other hand the meta is pretty set and there isn’t a ton of variety, so once you have a core group of Pokémon for this competition together, you should be set for good.